nature of probation practice today
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nature of probation practice today an empirical analysis of the skills, knowledge, and qualities used by probation officers : a report commissioned and funded by the Home Office Research and Planning Unit by Davies, Martin

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Published by Home Office Research and Planning Unit in [London] .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Great Britain.

Subjects:

  • Probation officers -- Training of -- Great Britain.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Martin Davies.
ContributionsGreat Britain. Home Office. Research and Planning Unit.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHV9345.A5 D377 1989
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 38 p. ;
Number of Pages38
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1931139M
ISBN 100862524458
LC Control Number90146880
OCLC/WorldCa24753389

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Based on the author's extensive experience as a senior New York State parole officer, this book features in-the-trenches practitioner's. insights of the complex, “real” world of probation and parole.. Comprehensive in approach, it explores the cutting-edge of both practice and theory with regard to all aspects of adult and juvenile probation, institutions, and parole—and highlights the. Others may question the inclusion of probation and parole history. I believe there is reason for it. To appraise modern practice, one must examine its philosophical roots and historical origins. Moreover, the history of probation and parole rarely is found in one place in the existing literature. The book offers analyses of why people offend and stop offending, and the wide ranging impacts of probation. This includes the impact on offenders' social reintegration, as a form of reparation for victims and communities, on public desire for justice and punishment, and on probationers : Palgrave Macmillan UK. The book includes analysis of why people offend and stop offending, and the wide ranging impacts of probation. This includes the impact on offenders' social reintegration, as a form of reparation for victims and communities, on public desire for justice and punishment, and on probationers themselves.

  This book explores the extent to which practitioners within the National Probation Service for England and Wales and the National Offender Management Service ascribe to the values, attitudes and beliefs associated with these macro and mezzo level changes and how much their practice has changed accordingly.   The book also covers the governance of probation and how policy and practice are responding to contemporary concerns about crime and community safety – for example through the management of risk. Although the main focus is on England and Wales, there is some discussion of other UK jurisdictions and of contemporary trends in European probation Reviews: 3.   In addition, if a judge wishes to impose special conditions, those conditions must relate to the nature of the crime that was committed. Revoking Probation. Since a person's freedom is at stake, there is a procedural due process before a court can revoke their probation. The following are the things that happen when you violate the terms of your probation; 1. Your probation officer may give you a strict warning. 2. If your probation officer chooses to report you, you may be asked to appear in court for a violation of probation hearing. 3.

Beginnings of Probation Services The origin of probation can be traced to English criminal law of the Middle Ages. Harsh punishments were imposed on adults and children alike for offenses that were not always of a serious nature. Sentences such as branding, flogging, mutilation, and execution were common. During the time of King Henry VIII, for instance, no less than 6. Initially, the Republic of Georgia imported the US practice of offenders paying fees when they are on probation. This has now ceased as the country recognised the exceptional nature of the practice and the disadvantages it may have in terms of rehabilitation This book provides a rigorous examination into the causes and effects of the abolishment of probation within the justice system. Addressing a wide range of subjects, such as current and historical perceptions of probation, the political factors which brought about its diminishment, and the effects of its dissolution, this study offers essential reading for those interested in broadening their. This article is a response to Ramsden and Lowton’s article ‘What’s needed as part of probation practice when working with personality disordered offenders? The importance of avoiding errors of logic’. Ramsden and Lowton offer a useful model, and practical guidance, that can assist practitioners to work in a psychologically informed way.